Keywords: Dolphins (16)

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Be an Ocean Helper

Be an Ocean Helper

This OLogy activity shows kids that there are simple, but very helpful ... (more)

This OLogy activity shows kids that there are simple, but very helpful things they can do to protect the ocean -- even if they live nowhere near the water. The activity opens by introducing kids to Gabby, a future marine biologist who wants to study dolphins. Then it has a checklist of 14 ways kids can be ocean helpers that includes asking for tap water instead of bottled water and leaving plants and animals where they find them. (less)

Subject:
Science and Technology
Material Type:
Activities and Labs
Collection:
American Museum of Natural History
Provider:
American Museum of Natural History
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Dolphin Brains

Dolphin Brains

Dolphins and other marine mammals have pretty big brains compared to the ... (more)

Dolphins and other marine mammals have pretty big brains compared to the size of their bodies. That's one indication of high intelligence, and anyone who has seen them perform at an aquarium or zoo can attest to that fact. Science reporter Bob Hirshon introduces us to one scientist who's trying to find out how dolphins got so brainy. (less)

Subject:
Science and Technology
Social Sciences
Material Type:
Activities and Labs
Audio Lectures
Collection:
Science Netlinks
Provider:
AAAS
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Dolphin Reproductive Behavior

Dolphin Reproductive Behavior

This video segment from the Science and Technology Chat series focuses on ... (more)

This video segment from the Science and Technology Chat series focuses on dolphin pregnancy, birth, and care of the young, and features Atlantic bottlenose dolphins living in captivity at the Mirage Resort Dolphin Habitat. ***Access to Teacher's Domain content now requires free login to PBS Learning Media. (less)

Subject:
Science and Technology
Material Type:
Video Lectures
Collection:
Teachers' Domain
Provider:
Vegas PBS
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Dolphin Skeleton - Backbone

Dolphin Skeleton - Backbone

The dolphin is built to be sleek. Its body is made of ... (more)

The dolphin is built to be sleek. Its body is made of almost entirely backbone (a gliding joint) which makes it very flexible under water. The ribs protect the inner organs of the dolphin and the tail beats from side to side, thrusting the animal forward. (less)

Subject:
Science and Technology
Material Type:
Images and Illustrations
Collection:
Video and Image Data Access
Provider:
California State University, Fullerton
Author:
Ketan Patel
No Strings Attached
Dolphin Skeleton (Gliding Joint)

Dolphin Skeleton (Gliding Joint)

The dolphin is built to be sleek. Its body is made of ... (more)

The dolphin is built to be sleek. Its body is made of almost entirely backbone (a gliding joint) which makes it very flexible under water. The ribs protect the inner organs of the dolphin and the tail beats from side to side, thrusting the animal forward. (less)

Subject:
Science and Technology
Material Type:
Images and Illustrations
Collection:
Video and Image Data Access
Provider:
California State University, Fullerton
Author:
Ketan Patel
No Strings Attached
Dolphin Skeleton - Limb (flippers)

Dolphin Skeleton - Limb (flippers)

The flippers of the dolphin help it swim through water. The ball ... (more)

The flippers of the dolphin help it swim through water. The ball and socket joint at the shoulder help the dolphin steer and roll while in the water, allowing it to actively swim and catch food while avoiding its predators. (less)

Subject:
Science and Technology
Material Type:
Images and Illustrations
Collection:
Video and Image Data Access
Provider:
California State University, Fullerton
Author:
Ketan Patel
No Strings Attached
Dolphin Skeleton - Limbs (Ball and Socket Joint)

Dolphin Skeleton - Limbs (Ball and Socket Joint)

The flippers of the dolphin help it swim through water. The ball ... (more)

The flippers of the dolphin help it swim through water. The ball and socket joint at the shoulder help the dolphin steer and roll while in the water, allowing it to actively swim and catch food while avoiding predators. (less)

Subject:
Science and Technology
Material Type:
Images and Illustrations
Collection:
Video and Image Data Access
Provider:
California State University, Fullerton
Author:
Ketan Patel
No Strings Attached
Dolphin Skeleton - Ribcage

Dolphin Skeleton - Ribcage

The dolphin is built to be sleek. Its body is made of ... (more)

The dolphin is built to be sleek. Its body is made of almost entirely backbone (a gliding joint) which makes it very flexible under water. The ribs protect the inner organs of the dolphin and the tail beats from side to side, thrusting the animal forward. (less)

Subject:
Science and Technology
Material Type:
Images and Illustrations
Collection:
Video and Image Data Access
Provider:
California State University, Fullerton
Author:
Ketan Patel
No Strings Attached
Dolphin Skeleton - Skull

Dolphin Skeleton - Skull

The carnivorous dolphin uses its sharp teeth to grab and hold onto ... (more)

The carnivorous dolphin uses its sharp teeth to grab and hold onto slippery prey. The skull, which protects the brain, is built to be sleek and allows the dolphin to move fast through water. (less)

Subject:
Science and Technology
Material Type:
Images and Illustrations
Collection:
Video and Image Data Access
Provider:
California State University, Fullerton
Author:
Ketan Patel
No Strings Attached
Dolphin Skeleton - Tail

Dolphin Skeleton - Tail

The dolphin is built to be sleek. Its body is made of ... (more)

The dolphin is built to be sleek. Its body is made of almost entirely backbone (a gliding joint) which makes it very flexible under water. The ribs protect the inner organs of the dolphin and the tail beats from side to side, thrusting the animal forward. (less)

Subject:
Science and Technology
Material Type:
Images and Illustrations
Collection:
Video and Image Data Access
Provider:
California State University, Fullerton
Author:
Ketan Patel
No Strings Attached
Dolphin skeleton

Dolphin skeleton

The dolphin has a large mouth to consume large prey. This animal ... (more)

The dolphin has a large mouth to consume large prey. This animal has a flexible skeleton and flippers/long fingers to move quickly and gracefully through the ocean. The ribs of the dolphin protect the animal's internal organs, but are loosely attached to the spine so they can collapse during dives to the deep ocean. (less)

Subject:
Science and Technology
Material Type:
Images and Illustrations
Collection:
Video and Image Data Access
Provider:
California State University, Fullerton
Author:
Katie Hale
No Strings Attached
Pink Dolphins of the Amazon

Pink Dolphins of the Amazon

This video resource from Jean-Michel Cousteau: Ocean Adventures explores the unique adaptations ... (more)

This video resource from Jean-Michel Cousteau: Ocean Adventures explores the unique adaptations developed by the pink river dolphin in order to survive in the freshwater rivers of the Amazon. ***Access to Teacher's Domain content now requires free login to PBS Learning Media. (less)

Subject:
Science and Technology
Material Type:
Video Lectures
Collection:
Teachers' Domain
Provider:
KQED Education
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Science of NFL Football: Nutrition, Hydration & Health

Science of NFL Football: Nutrition, Hydration & Health

NBC's Lester Holt looks at the physically demanding pre-season ritual of NFL ... (more)

NBC's Lester Holt looks at the physically demanding pre-season ritual of NFL training camp. Douglas Casa, head of the Korey Stringer Institute at the University of Connecticut, and athletic trainers from the Pittsburgh Steelers explain what NFL players must do to stay hydrated and replenish the essential nutrients needed to maintain good health during rigorous practices. "Science of NFL Football" is a 10-part video series funded by the National Science Foundation and produced in partnership with the National Football League. (less)

Subject:
Mathematics and Statistics
Science and Technology
Material Type:
Lesson Plans
Video Lectures
Collection:
NBC Learn
Provider:
NBC_Learn
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What Happened to the Dolphins?

What Happened to the Dolphins?

This case study is based on the 1978 – 1988 Bottlenose dolphin ... (more)

This case study is based on the 1978 – 1988 Bottlenose dolphin die-offs along the Atlantic coast of the U.S. It demonstrates nature of science, as new information evolved theories change. New observations lead to more sophisticated inferences, as more observations are carefully recorded, better inferences can be made. (less)

Subject:
Science and Technology
Material Type:
Case Study
Homework and Assignments
Readings
Collection:
Connexions
Provider:
Rice University
Author:
Sarah Burkett
No Strings Attached
What's the Big Idea? Marine Biology

What's the Big Idea? Marine Biology

This fun Web article is part of OLogy, where kids can collect ... (more)

This fun Web article is part of OLogy, where kids can collect virtual trading cards and create projects with them. Here, they learn about marine biology. It All Started in the Ocean looks at how the world's five great oceans are linked and how scientists know that life probably started in the oceans. Mysteries of the Deep explains that scientists know less about the ocean than they do about the dark side of the Moon. There Are So Many Ways to Live in the Sea debunks the perception that the ocean is one big ecosystem. Underwater Wonders has links to trading cards that showcase some of the "biggest, smallest, fastest, weirdest, coolest, spookiest stuff" on the planet. Ocean Layer Cake profiles the sunlit, twilight, and dark zones. Life on the Edge looks at continental shelves, where 80 percent of all sea life lives. Just How Do You Live in the Water? highlights some of the special adaptations sea organisms need. The Oceans and Us looks at human dependence on the ocean and the risks we pose to it. (less)

Subject:
Science and Technology
Material Type:
Readings
Collection:
American Museum of Natural History
Provider:
American Museum of Natural History
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Subject:
Science and Technology
Material Type:
Assessments
Full Course
Homework and Assignments
Lecture Notes
Syllabi
Collection:
MIT OpenCourseWare
Provider:
M.I.T.
Author:
George Kocur
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